Media Club 
of Ottawa


the Media Club of Ottawa presents monthly programs of significance
 to professionals in all branches of the communications field. 
Our program offers a stimulating variety of speakers, 
workshops and social events


Monthly meetings take place  at Ottawa City Hall,
Billings Room
, 110 Laurier Ave West
on the second-last or last Tuesday of the month 
April 2018
The Galley  Books by members About Awards Members News


Media Club of Ottawa
 Executive  2015-2016
President,  June Coxon
Secretary-Treasurer.Iris ten Holder
Email:
Programs
Publicity
Board of Directors: June Coxon,  Iris ten Holder, Janet Webb, Helen Bednarek Van Eyk
***
Are you a writer, a journalist, a reporter for other media, TV, Radio or online? The Media Club of Ottawa is accepting new members. Meetings are open to non-members so join us. The meeting fee of $10 will be deducted from the membership fee. upon joining. Membership forms are available at the meeting. For added convenience, the membership application form is also available for downloading by clicking the link below.
 
Membership Application
Membership Fee $60



Program
2017-2018


December 2, 2017
Social
Lunch at the Lord Elgin Hotel and silent auction fundraiser.

February 3. 2018
Workshop 
at Algonquin College
 
20 March 2018

Tim Gordon, Burnstown Publishing
40 years publishing industry

at Ottawa City Hall

 24 April 2018
Speaker: Dwayne Winseck,  
 Topic: The Canadian Media Concentration Project Explained.

at Ottawa City Hall

22 May 2018

 at Ottawa City Hall

June 2018
TBA


Program suggestions are welcome
here

***

.
Remembering

Rosaleen Dickson (1921-2018)
Henry Heald (1929 - 2016) *
Mike Heenan (1942-2014)
Borgny Pearson (1920-2014)
Olive Dickason (1920-2011
Ethel Jean Southworth (1923-2008)
Melba Lent Woelfle (1910-2004)
Gladys Arnold (1905-2002)

(Note: This new section was prompted by the recent passing of Rosaleen Dickson. Due to time constraints on my part this section will be improved little by little until  fully updated with links to individual pages. Iris-Editor)
Submit comments to Media Club of Ottawa
Subject: Remembering




More information about this month's meeting

Taking a broad and long-term view of the communications and media landscape, ever more internet- and mobile wireless-centric, the research highlights which media sectors are growing, which stagnating, those that are in decline, and some - the music industry, in particular - that are recovering after being dealt punishing blows over the past two decades. Winseck will highlight which parts of the media have seen concentration levels rise and where they have fallen. His talk will also hone in on the stature of the digital goliaths such as Google and Facebook, which were estimated to account for nearly three-quarters of the $5.6 billion in internet advertising revenue in 2016.

 

At the same time, however, he will ague that the scale and scope of their dominance has been exaggerated, and do so by highlighting the unique features that set Canada apart from its international peers: Sky-high levels of vertical integration in which all the main commercial TV services are owned by mobile phone operators and internet access service providers (ISPs). Moreover, unlike in the United States, Europe and elsewhere, where stand-alone mobile operators like T-Mobile, Sprint, 3, Vodafone, and so on battle their “wired” rivals, in Canada the biggest companies’ - ie Bell, Rogers, Telus, Quebecor and Shaw - control the ‘wired internet’, mobile wireless networks, and cable television distribution. This is called diagonal integration.

 

These realities, Winseck argues, subordinate television, journalism and the other media forms to telephone companies that know little about the media and cultural industries. They also bring about the high cost of internet and mobile wireless services, and low data caps, all of which constrain who gets to communicate what to whom under what terms. They also skew the policy and regulatory arena around the dynamics of ‘noblesse oblige’ politics whereby the main media and journalistic associations and unions sidle up to the biggest players in the hope that, by playing nice, the telecom giants will treat them well - which has thus far proven to be a grave mistake, with lay-offs galore and media workers’ loss of control over their work and working conditions.

 

This “closed system” mentally also puts media unions and professional associations on the wrong side of citizens’ interests when it comes to values like net neutrality - where Canada distinguishes itself with something of the ”gold standard” in the world - as they join forces with the companies to advocate for policy tools that would gut net neutrality, keep data caps low, and usher in website blocking schemes that pose threats to the rule-of-law, free expression and privacy values, and the principles upon which democracy in Canada has been built. Crucially, such advocacy also distracts our attention away from what could be done to improve the state of journalism and media.

 

Journalists, policy-wonks, lawyers, academics, students, and citizens in general who find such issues fascinating will find this event of interest, with lots to ponder and debate.


NEWS........NEWS.........NEWS........

New
Community newspapers
launching in Ottawa the first week of April. - 

Residents in Ottawa's west and south ends will soon find a new community paper waiting in their mailbox. Four newspapers will be launching this month under the banner of Your Community Voice.
CBC.ca


Quick Links

.  

Program

In the News - Jan-Apr

In the News - Apr-Dec

Members' News

Meeting Reports

Awards





A R C H I V E S

 Meetings held in previous years:

The highlighted links below will show a list of speakers for the year 


2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13

Taking a broad and long-term view of the communications and media landscape, ever more internet- and mobile wireless-centric, the research highlights which media sectors are growing, which stagnating, those that are in decline, and some - the music industry, in particular - that are recovering after being dealt punishing blows over the past two decades. Winseck will highlight which parts of the media have seen concentration levels rise and where they have fallen. His talk will also hone in on the stature of the digital goliaths such as Google and Facebook, which were estimated to account for nearly three-quarters of the $5.6 billion in internet advertising revenue in 2016.

 

At the same time, however, he will ague that the scale and scope of their dominance has been exaggerated, and do so by highlighting the unique features that set Canada apart from its international peers: Sky-high levels of vertical integration in which all the main commercial TV services are owned by mobile phone operators and internet access service providers (ISPs). Moreover, unlike in the United States, Europe and elsewhere, where stand-alone mobile operators like T-Mobile, Sprint, 3, Vodafone, and so on battle their “wired” rivals, in Canada the biggest companies’ - ie Bell, Rogers, Telus, Quebecor and Shaw - control the ‘wired internet’, mobile wireless networks, and cable television distribution. This is called diagonal integration.

 

These realities, Winseck argues, subordinate television, journalism and the other media forms to telephone companies that know little about the media and cultural industries. They also bring about the high cost of internet and mobile wireless services, and low data caps, all of which constrain who gets to communicate what to whom under what terms. They also skew the policy and regulatory arena around the dynamics of ‘noblesse oblige’ politics whereby the main media and journalistic associations and unions sidle up to the biggest players in the hope that, by playing nice, the telecom giants will treat them well - which has thus far proven to be a grave mistake, with lay-offs galore and media workers’ loss of control over their work and working conditions.

 

This “closed system” mentally also puts media unions and professional associations on the wrong side of citizens’ interests when it comes to values like net neutrality - where Canada distinguishes itself with something of the ”gold standard” in the world - as they join forces with the companies to advocate for policy tools that would gut net neutrality, keep data caps low, and usher in website blocking schemes that pose threats to the rule-of-law, free expression and privacy values, and the principles upon which democracy in Canada has been built. Crucially, such advocacy also distracts our attention away from what could be done to improve the state of journalism and media.

 

Journalists, policy-wonks, lawyers, academics, students, and citizens in general who find such issues fascinating will find this event of interest, with lots to ponder and debate.

2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17

to be updated as soon as possible.
A web savvy volunteer to help with this task will be welcome. For more information use this email  

 ***

.

Award Programs

The Margaret Graham Award
is awarded yearly in November to students at Algonquin College and Carleton University

 Recipients for 2017 were Rebecca Atkinson of Algonquin College and Gabrielle Van Looyen of Carleton University

***
The Melba Lent Woelflé Award
is awarded yearly in June to a journalism student with excellent writing skill at Algonquin College.
 Recipient for 2017 was Michael Clarke.




Next Meeting

April 24, 2018

6pm - 8pm

The Media Club of Ottawa
presents 

Dwayne Winseck, Carleton University journalism professor with a cross appointment at the Institute of Political Economy, award winning author and director of the Canadian Media Concentration Project.

Topic:

The Canadian Media Concentration Project Explained

Location:

Billings room, Ottawa City Hall,

110 Laurier Ave. West,

Ottawa, ON 

For more information call 613 521-4855. RSVP by April 22

Journalism students with ID free. Media Club and CAJ members $15 Non-members $10, with  meal $25

About the speaker:
Dwayne R. Winseck is a Professor at the School of Journalism and Communication, with a cross-appointment to the Institute of Political Economy, Carleton University. He has taught courses or given lectures and workshops in Argentina, China, Denmark, Mexico, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United States and Uruguay.

His research interests include the political economy of media, internet and telecommunications, media history and media theory. He is also the Director of the Canadian Media Concentration Research Project <cmcrp.org> and has been the lead Canadian researcher in the International Media Concentration Research Project since 2009.  He is a regular participant in regulatory and policy proceedings in Canada convened by the CRTC, the Competition Bureau as well as various committees of the Parliament of Canada. 

Dwayne was a regular columnist for the online edition of one of Canada’s largest English-speaking newspapers, the Globe and Mail, and maintains a well-regarded blog, Mediamorphis <dwmw.wordpress.org> and another for the Canadian Media Concentration Research Project <cmcrp.org>.

His co-authored book with Robert Pike Communication and Empire: Media, Markets and Globalization, 1860-1930 won the Canadian Communication Association’s book-of-the-year prize in 2008. He is also co-editor, with Dal Yong Jin, of Political Econ 20 March 2018

Tim Gordon, Burnstown Publishing
40 years publishing industry

at Ottawa City Hallomies of the Media (2011) and several other edited and sole-authored books.

***
======================
Previous Meetings

Tuesday March 20, 2018



Tim Gordon, Burnstown Publishing

Topic

40 years publishing industry


***


Saturday, February 3, 2018

Workshop at Algonquin College

Margaret Graham Awards Presentation to Gabrielle Van Looyen from Carleton
University

Topic: How to Make a Print- and Online Newspaper - Without Breaking the Bank

Panelists:
  • Theresa Fritz.  Metroland Media’s Managing Editor until January 2018.
  • Glen Gower, a communications and marketing professional,  owner/editor of StittsvilleCentral.ca, an independent news and information source for the Stittsville area.
  • Anita Murray, a career journalist with more than 25 years as an editor and writer at the Ottawa Citizen.
  • Patrick Langston.  a freelance writer at the Ottawa Citizen for 17 years.

***

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Margaret Graham Awards Presentation to Rebecca Atkinson from Algonquin College

Guest Speaker David Mulholland  discussed his latest book Chaudière Falls
www.davidmulholland.ca

***

On Tuesday October 24, 2017

The Health of Ethnic Media

Panelists:
  • Czeslaw Piasta, editor, online newspaper Komunikaty Ottawskie
  • Myka Burk, host/producer award-winning/Peabody nominated German show on CHIN radio, and feature writer, Ottawa Life magazine
  • Jagjeet Sharma, co-host of Asian Sounds, CKCU radio; and
  • Waclaw Kujbida, producer of the Rogers television program, Polish Review.

On Tuesday September 19, 2017

Taking a broad and long-term view of the communications and media landscape, ever more internet- and mobile wireless-centric, the research highlights which media sectors are growing, which stagnating, those that are in decline, and some - the music industry, in particular - that are recovering after being dealt punishing blows over the past two decades. Winseck will highlight which parts of the media have seen concentration levels rise and where they have fallen. His talk will also hone in on the stature of the digital goliaths such as Google and Facebook, which were estimated to account for nearly three-quarters of the $5.6 billion in internet advertising revenue in 2016.

 

At the same time, however, he will ague that the scale and scope of their dominance has been exaggerated, and do so by highlighting the unique features that set Canada apart from its international peers: Sky-high levels of vertical integration in which all the main commercial TV services are owned by mobile phone operators and internet access service providers (ISPs). Moreover, unlike in the United States, Europe and elsewhere, where stand-alone mobile operators like T-Mobile, Sprint, 3, Vodafone, and so on battle their “wired” rivals, in Canada the biggest companies’ - ie Bell, Rogers, Telus, Quebecor and Shaw - control the ‘wired internet’, mobile wireless networks, and cable television distribution. This is called diagonal integration.

 

These realities, Winseck argues, subordinate television, journalism and the other media forms to telephone companies that know little about the media and cultural industries. They also bring about the high cost of internet and mobile wireless services, and low data caps, all of which constrain who gets to communicate what to whom under what terms. They also skew the policy and regulatory arena around the dynamics of ‘noblesse oblige’ politics whereby the main media and journalistic associations and unions sidle up to the biggest players in the hope that, by playing nice, the telecom giants will treat them well - which has thus far proven to be a grave mistake, with lay-offs galore and media workers’ loss of control over their work and working conditions.

 

This “closed system” mentally also puts media unions and professional associations on the wrong side of citizens’ interests when it comes to values like net neutrality - where Canada distinguishes itself with something of the ”gold standard” in the world - as they join forces with the companies to advocate for policy tools that would gut net neutrality, keep data caps low, and usher in website blocking schemes that pose threats to the rule-of-law, free expression and privacy values, and the principles upon which democracy in Canada has been built. Crucially, such advocacy also distracts our attention away from what could be done to improve the state of journalism and media.

 

Journalists, policy-wonks, lawyers, academics, students, and citizens in general who find such issues fascinating will find this event of interest, with lots to ponder and debate.

Teejeshwara Sharma

Tejeshwar "TJ" Sharma,  Senior Advisor at Indigenous and Northern Affairs (INAC) Discussed Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) and Right to Know Week.



Help build the Media Club's "Melba Lent Woelflé Scholarship Fund."
To contribute,  e-mail Valerie Knowles

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